Cindy’s iPhone Starter Kit

February 5, 2016

It’s Cindy’s birthday, and she’s all grown up now with her very own iPhone.

After consulting with my own personal Apple Genius, I’ve come up with a list of apps that Cindy should purchase using the iTunes gift card we got her for her birthday. I’ve broken these down into a few different areas…

Word Games

Health & Fitness

Hipster Stuff

Useful Apps

  • Yelp – find good stuff nearby
  • Google Maps – sometimes better than built-in map app
  • Todoist – To-Do List/Task Manager

Happy iPhoning, Cindy!

 


Sufferfest at the Banff Mountain Film Festival

April 6, 2014

Every year we travel to Downieville to watch the Banff Mountain Film Festival movies as part of their annual tour. Downieville might be their smallest stop in the world, with a theater that seats about 200 good friends. It’s an hour drive on windy roads from where I live in Nevada City, but once we’re there it’s always a fun party, including the annual intermission frisbee-fest.

This year my favorite film was The Sufferfest, featuring Alex Honnold and Cedar Wright. You might remember Alex from all of movies and articles about the crazy free solo climbs he’s done, but Sufferfest is a different kind of adventure – he and Cedar climb all of the California 14ers, biking between the peaks.

What made it extra cool was that Schmed & I climbed these same peaks 20+ years ago, as part of a goal to summit them by the time we turned 30. And we also biked part of the way up White Mountain on our way to Barcroft right before Schmed’s knee surgery.

During the film they showed a shot of the register box on the top of Polemonium Peak, which I’d hauled up and installed in 1991. The register has a sad back-story. In 1988 Robin Ingraham was climbing with his friend Mark Hoffman at Devil’s Crag #8. A talus chute slid during their descent, and Mark went over a cliff. He was still alive, so Robin made an epic hike to get help (from back country ranger Randy Morgensen, see The Last Season) , but Mark didn’t survive the night. As a tribute to Mark, Robin started making summit registers, and I wound up getting a box from him for Polemonium.

Here’s me installing it back in 1991…

Image

And proof that it’s still there, from The Sufferfest movie…

Image

Good to see it’s still in place, as many of these registered have been vandalized, removed by rangers, or stolen over the years. There’s an article written by Robin Ingraham in 2008 about the history of registers in the Sierra Nevada, for those interested. What’s interesting to me is that Robin is strongly opposed to any mention of registers online, as he feels this gives would-be thieves more information about what to steal, and how. My views on this have evolved into treating registers more like prayer flags, which are left in place to fade as the years pass – I think historical records should be copied, but the originals left on the tops of peaks. If they get stolen, or water-damaged, or struck by lightening…that’s part of their story too, and someone will have to start a new register.


Project Vote Smart Rocks

October 25, 2012

I got a letter recently from Project Vote Smart, thanking me for being one of their original supports (beginning around 1990 or so). They also sent a nice pin.

Image

But what I really like is being able to go to their web site during this gnarly election process and find real data about candidates, instead of having to sift through the endless commentary that floods the news.

I realize they’re a small voice compared to all of the Super-PACs that are pouring money into races & ballot measures, but they also are one of the few rays of light I can find in the political landscape. If you’re a voter who likes to make their own decisions instead of voting the “party line”, I’d strongly encourage you to support them.

 

 


Can Ken Climb Aconcagua?

September 2, 2012

Schmed & I have decided to attempt Aconcagua this December.

Aconcagua

Which doesn’t leave much time for travel planning, setting up Big Data training in Buenos Aires, finding mule packers to help get gear up to base camp, and (most importantly) implementing a training regime appropriate for getting to almost 23,000ft.

We’re planning to make it a business-climbing-vacation trip, which means the family flies to Buenos Aires in mid-December, and we spend two weeks exploring the city and surrounding areas.


Grandama Dierker’s Button Collection

April 10, 2012

I grew up in southern California (Whittier), which is pretty close to Knott’s Berry Farm.

Back in the 1960’s, this wasn’t yet a typical theme park filled with roller coaster rides. There was a nice old-time feel to the place, with chickens and peacocks wandering around the parking lot.

We’d visit regularly, and every such trip included a viewing of The Button Collection.

My grandmother lived in Filer, Idaho and collected thousands of buttons over the years. Eventually an aunt finished off the collection and donated it to Knott’s Berry Farm, where it’s still on display.


Interesting dates in computer programming

July 15, 2011

Everybody knows about the Linux “epoch”, as in January 1st, 1970 UTC.

Some people might remember the original Mac OS equivalent, which was January 1st, 1904. From what I remember back in the day, Jerome Coonen picked that date (instead of 1900) because it simplified the leap year calculations. And using an unsigned 32 bit value for seconds meant that Macs could handle dates up to 2023 or some point way in the future.

Then yesterday I came across the MUMPS/Caché “$h” date format, which is described as:

This format returns the date as the number of days since 1st January 1841, and the time as the number of seconds since midnight.

I was speculating with my friend as to why they picked 1841, and guessed that this was some convenient date (similar to the Mac 1904 choice) that was before the birthdate of the oldest person they could imagine being in the system, back in the 1960s.

After turning to the Source of Truth (Wikipedia’s article on MUMPS), it seems like our guess was correct. James Poitras explains why he picked this odd date:

I remembered reading of the oldest (one of the oldest?) U.S. citizen, a Civil War veteran, who was 121 years old at the time. Since I wanted to be able to represent dates in a Julian-type form so that age could be easily calculated and to be able to represent any birth date in the numeric range selected, I decided that a starting date in the early 1840s would be ‘safe.’ Since my algorithm worked most logically when every fourth year was a leap year, the first year was taken as 1841. The zero point was then December 31, 1840


Maiden voyage of Garmin foretrex 401

July 10, 2011

I finally got a chance to try out the new Garmin wrist-mounted GPS unit that my friend Stefan gave me.

Pretty sweet – it does a good job of tracking, even in the foothills of the Sierras, where GPS signals come and go.

I wish I could directly embed the map of the hike, but that requires an , which isn’t allowed by wordpress.com – oh well. You can still click here to view it on the garmin.com site.